Trump's Fox News Meltdown Over 'People In Dark Shadows' Lights Up Twitter

  
Via:  Harpo  •  4 years ago  •  10 comments

By:   Ed Mazza (Yahoo)

Trump's Fox News Meltdown Over 'People In Dark Shadows' Lights Up Twitter
Trump kicked off a strange new conspiracy theory.

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President Donald Trump sat down with Laura Ingraham for a lengthy interview on Fox News Monday and his critics couldn't decide on the wildest part.

Trump attacked Black Lives Matter, saying the name alone was "bad for Black people" and compared the police officer who shot a Black man in the back seven times to a golfer who missed an easy putt.

He also presented a series of conspiracy theories, claiming "people that are in the dark shadows" control both "the streets" and former Vice President Joe Biden. And he spun a conspiracy theory about an airplane:

"We had somebody get on a plane from a certain city this weekend. And in the plane, it was almost completely loaded with thugs, wearing these dark uniforms, black uniforms, with gear and this and that."

Trump claimed the people on the plane wanted to "do big damage" to the Republican National Convention, yet offered no other details.

The president's claims were so wild that Ingraham jumped in to try and save him several times.

The strange interview was all the talk on Twitter:

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.


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Harpo
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1  seeder  Harpo    4 years ago

An article promoted by Harpo who is cannot depromote.

 
 
 
Groucho
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1.1  Groucho  replied to  Harpo @1    4 months ago

Another comment

to again flag

 
 
 
Harpo
experienced silent
2  seeder  Harpo    4 years ago

 
 
 
Groucho
experienced silent
2.1  Groucho  replied to  Harpo @2    4 months ago

[ADDED ADDED ADDED]

[] comment to flag.

With quite [] complex.

[REPLACEMENT] [] make it more complex. [ADDED ADDED]

This is another one with more comment language. [ADDED]

[ADDED ADDED]

 
 
 
Groucho
experienced silent
3  Groucho    4 months ago

Another comment to flag.

 
 
 
Groucho
experienced silent
4  Groucho    4 months ago
Yet another comment to flag. 

Here is a second sentence to make this more complex. 

Here is a third to make it more complex.  

This is another one with do not do this again language.

 
 
 
Groucho
experienced silent
5  Groucho    4 months ago

Yet another comment to flag. 

This be the second sentence.

 
 
 
TiG
expert active
6  TiG    4 months ago
The Senate has a chaplain and they are common in the military and other groups. What's the beef?

The difference between an adult knowing what religion is and choosing to interact with a representative of the religion and a child not being educated on world religions and being offered one without proper education on the fine print.

Even adults are duped into following "spiritual" leaders who use and abuse them and even lead them to their deaths.  Children, especially troubled/lonely children, are the most susceptible to indoctrination into a religion or gang.  There is no reason to allow even the possibility of potential abuse by religious indoctrination into our public schools.

I will cite a small portion on an article that explains the potential dangers of allowing religious indoctrination of children in public schools.

How—and Why—Americans Become Susceptible to the Toxic Allure of Cults ‹ Literary Hub (lithub.com)

AM:   Well, I think most fundamentally when a white, middle-aged, seemingly educated man speaks confidently about God and government, a lot of us are likely to listen by default. That sort of voice is just the default sound of authority in our culture. I sometimes joke that cult leaders like David Koresh and Keith Raniere (the leader of NXIVM) all the way to “cult leaders” like Elon Musk and Greg Glassman (the founder of CrossFit) could be first cousins because they look so much alike. This is just this type of guy who matches our perceptions of power and who we think deserves it. It has little to do with charm or some kind of magical charisma, actually. It’s a question of, who are we willing to listen to by default?

Now, Jim Jones was a little bit special because he was able to appeal to such a wide range of different people from different backgrounds. And this had everything to do with his diabolical style of code switching. He learned to master the sociolect of so many different groups, from countercultural college kids who could be smitten by him waxing Socialist all the way to older Black women active in the church. Consistently, survivors told me that the first conversation they ever had with Jim Jones, it felt like he was “speaking their language.”

He was widely read, well-studied. And he had ties to all the “right” people in San Francisco: Angela Davis, the Black Panthers, and others, so he seemed quite trustworthy. But his bottom line was always power, so he didn’t learn to quote Nietzsche or preach like Father Divine for any other reason than to exchange these skills for something pernicious later. I just think we’re all conditioned to trust a confident white man speaking from a position of authority saying, “I have the answers to single-handedly pull you out of suffering.”

KG:   There are often a lot of women in cults. Can you talk about that?

AM:   Again, I think it depends on your definition of the word “cult,” but what I’ll say is this: it’s not that women are simply easier to hoodwink. For example, in the Jonestown massacre, Black women died in disproportionate numbers (and by the way, Jonestown was more of a murder/coerced suicide, not really a suicide as it’s been painted), but—and I’m quoting the feminist Jonestown scholar Sikivu Hutchinson here—that happened mostly because Black women were especially vulnerable due to their history of sexist and racist exploitation.

One of the reasons why so many of these women remained loyal and ultimately perished was because they had so much to gain from a movement that promised them something better, which of course turned out to be a lie. And I think that’s true of women of all kinds of different backgrounds—traditional religion and patriarchy, in general, have not been too kind to them. So when someone else comes in and tells you, “Hey, I have a different way,” that sounds really promising. Especially if you’re young and being love-bombed by this older man, and you’re college-educated and full of hope.

KG:   In the cult where I grew up, there was a group that was recruited from elite colleges in the Northeast; they were really just looking for a solution. And my father said to me later about my mother, “she needed to believe in something.” Her dad taught at Cornell. Her ex-husband went on to become a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. She was in college when she was recruited, but she desperately needed something to believe in. You talk about that in your book—this whole idea of the person who needs something to believe in, but is smart and alert and imaginative, which pushes back against this theory that people who wind up in cults are just not smart enough to figure out life for themselves.
 
 
 
TiG
expert active
7  TiG    4 months ago
The Senate has a chaplain and they are common in the military and other groups. What's the beef?

The difference between an adult knowing what religion is and choosing to interact with a representative of the religion and a child not being educated on world religions and being offered one without proper education on the fine print.

Even adults are duped into following "spiritual" leaders who use and abuse them and even lead them to their deaths.  Children, especially troubled/lonely children, are the most susceptible to indoctrination into a religion or gang.  There is no reason to allow even the possibility of potential abuse by religious indoctrination into our public schools.

I will cite a small portion on an article that explains the potential dangers of allowing religious indoctrination of children in public schools.

How—and Why—Americans Become Susceptible to the Toxic Allure of Cults ‹ Literary Hub (lithub.com)

AM:   Well, I think most fundamentally when a white, middle-aged, seemingly educated man speaks confidently about God and government, a lot of us are likely to listen by default. That sort of voice is just the default sound of authority in our culture. I sometimes joke that cult leaders like David Koresh and Keith Raniere (the leader of NXIVM) all the way to “cult leaders” like Elon Musk and Greg Glassman (the founder of CrossFit) could be first cousins because they look so much alike. This is just this type of guy who matches our perceptions of power and who we think deserves it. It has little to do with charm or some kind of magical charisma, actually. It’s a question of, who are we willing to listen to by default?

Now, Jim Jones was a little bit special because he was able to appeal to such a wide range of different people from different backgrounds. And this had everything to do with his diabolical style of code switching. He learned to master the sociolect of so many different groups, from countercultural college kids who could be smitten by him waxing Socialist all the way to older Black women active in the church. Consistently, survivors told me that the first conversation they ever had with Jim Jones, it felt like he was “speaking their language.”

He was widely read, well-studied. And he had ties to all the “right” people in San Francisco: Angela Davis, the Black Panthers, and others, so he seemed quite trustworthy. But his bottom line was always power, so he didn’t learn to quote Nietzsche or preach like Father Divine for any other reason than to exchange these skills for something pernicious later. I just think we’re all conditioned to trust a confident white man speaking from a position of authority saying, “I have the answers to single-handedly pull you out of suffering.”

KG:   There are often a lot of women in cults. Can you talk about that?

AM:   Again, I think it depends on your definition of the word “cult,” but what I’ll say is this: it’s not that women are simply easier to hoodwink. For example, in the Jonestown massacre, Black women died in disproportionate numbers (and by the way, Jonestown was more of a murder/coerced suicide, not really a suicide as it’s been painted), but—and I’m quoting the feminist Jonestown scholar Sikivu Hutchinson here—that happened mostly because Black women were especially vulnerable due to their history of sexist and racist exploitation.

One of the reasons why so many of these women remained loyal and ultimately perished was because they had so much to gain from a movement that promised them something better, which of course turned out to be a lie. And I think that’s true of women of all kinds of different backgrounds—traditional religion and patriarchy, in general, have not been too kind to them. So when someone else comes in and tells you, “Hey, I have a different way,” that sounds really promising. Especially if you’re young and being love-bombed by this older man, and you’re college-educated and full of hope.

KG:   In the cult where I grew up, there was a group that was recruited from elite colleges in the Northeast; they were really just looking for a solution. And my father said to me later about my mother, “she needed to believe in something.” Her dad taught at Cornell. Her ex-husband went on to become a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. She was in college when she was recruited, but she desperately needed something to believe in. You talk about that in your book—this whole idea of the person who needs something to believe in, but is smart and alert and imaginative, which pushes back against this theory that people who wind up in cults are just not smart enough to figure out life for themselves.
 
 
 
TiG
expert active
8  TiG    4 months ago
The Senate has a chaplain and they are common in the military and other groups. What's the beef?

The difference between an adult knowing what religion is and choosing to interact with a representative of the religion and a child not being educated on world religions and being offered one without proper education on the fine print.

Even adults are duped into following "spiritual" leaders who use and abuse them and even lead them to their deaths.  Children, especially troubled/lonely children, are the most susceptible to indoctrination into a religion or gang.  There is no reason to allow even the possibility of potential abuse by religious indoctrination into our public schools.

I will cite a small portion on an article that explains the potential dangers of allowing religious indoctrination of children in public schools.

How—and Why—Americans Become Susceptible to the Toxic Allure of Cults ‹ Literary Hub (lithub.com)

AM:   Well, I think most fundamentally when a white, middle-aged, seemingly educated man speaks confidently about God and government, a lot of us are likely to listen by default. That sort of voice is just the default sound of authority in our culture. I sometimes joke that cult leaders like David Koresh and Keith Raniere (the leader of NXIVM) all the way to “cult leaders” like Elon Musk and Greg Glassman (the founder of CrossFit) could be first cousins because they look so much alike. This is just this type of guy who matches our perceptions of power and who we think deserves it. It has little to do with charm or some kind of magical charisma, actually. It’s a question of, who are we willing to listen to by default?

Now, Jim Jones was a little bit special because he was able to appeal to such a wide range of different people from different backgrounds. And this had everything to do with his diabolical style of code switching. He learned to master the sociolect of so many different groups, from countercultural college kids who could be smitten by him waxing Socialist all the way to older Black women active in the church. Consistently, survivors told me that the first conversation they ever had with Jim Jones, it felt like he was “speaking their language.”

He was widely read, well-studied. And he had ties to all the “right” people in San Francisco: Angela Davis, the Black Panthers, and others, so he seemed quite trustworthy. But his bottom line was always power, so he didn’t learn to quote Nietzsche or preach like Father Divine for any other reason than to exchange these skills for something pernicious later. I just think we’re all conditioned to trust a confident white man speaking from a position of authority saying, “I have the answers to single-handedly pull you out of suffering.”

KG:   There are often a lot of women in cults. Can you talk about that?

AM:   Again, I think it depends on your definition of the word “cult,” but what I’ll say is this: it’s not that women are simply easier to hoodwink. For example, in the Jonestown massacre, Black women died in disproportionate numbers (and by the way, Jonestown was more of a murder/coerced suicide, not really a suicide as it’s been painted), but—and I’m quoting the feminist Jonestown scholar Sikivu Hutchinson here—that happened mostly because Black women were especially vulnerable due to their history of sexist and racist exploitation.

One of the reasons why so many of these women remained loyal and ultimately perished was because they had so much to gain from a movement that promised them something better, which of course turned out to be a lie. And I think that’s true of women of all kinds of different backgrounds—traditional religion and patriarchy, in general, have not been too kind to them. So when someone else comes in and tells you, “Hey, I have a different way,” that sounds really promising. Especially if you’re young and being love-bombed by this older man, and you’re college-educated and full of hope.

KG:   In the cult where I grew up, there was a group that was recruited from elite colleges in the Northeast; they were really just looking for a solution. And my father said to me later about my mother, “she needed to believe in something.” Her dad taught at Cornell. Her ex-husband went on to become a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. She was in college when she was recruited, but she desperately needed something to believe in. You talk about that in your book—this whole idea of the person who needs something to believe in, but is smart and alert and imaginative, which pushes back against this theory that people who wind up in cults are just not smart enough to figure out life for themselves.
 
 

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